Real estate reads: disappearing lawns, Littleton considers ditching urban renewal and more

What happened to lawns? They got eaten by houses.

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An American flag planted in the lawn at Washington Park during the July 4th weekend. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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An American flag planted in the lawn at Washington Park during the July 4th weekend. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

My three favorite real estate reads of the afternoon so far: shrinking lawns, urban renewal and more on the housing stock of Denver.

Kids, stay off of all those lawns this summer. There’s barely any room for you there. The median yard has shrunk by more than 26 percent since 1978, reports the Atlantic. What’s the deal? It’s smaller lots and bigger houses. Click through and check out all the graphics on this one.

Urban renewal authorities are supposed to fix up medium- and high-density areas that no longer draw people in. And most urban renewal authorities that disband tend to do so after the projects they were designed to address have been completed, Kevin Bommer of the Colorado Municipal League told the Denver Post. Not so in Littleton! Read why the city is embarking on the controversial move.

The Denver Business Journal takes on the new 23-page report on Denver housing from the Denver Metro Association of Realtors. DBJ gets into the luxury market in their write-up, which is still on a hot streak.