Denver’s earliest snowfalls since 1878, including 4 inches on Sept. 3, 1961

staff photo
A nostalgic look into the past. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)  snow; denverite; kevinjbeaty;

Dreaming of a white Labor Day. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Since 1878, it’s snowed in Denver during September about one out of every five years on average, according to data from the National Weather Service.

But the last time Denver saw snowflakes during the month was Sept. 24, 2000, when two-tenths of an inch dusted the city, meteorologist Kyle Fredin said Tuesday.

Given the 15-year dry spell, Denver’s overdue to see September snow. But is that a possibility in 2016?

“There’s no chance,” Fredin said. “It looks like we’re going to wrap up September snowless.”

Below are the top 10 earliest snowfalls in Denver going back 138 years. The National Weather Service considers “measurable snowfall” anything above one-tenth of an inch.

Source: National Weather Service (Adrian D. Garcia/Denverite)

Business & data reporter Adrian D. Garcia can be reached via email at agarcia@denverite.com or twitter.com/adriandgarcia.

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