Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, May 5

(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

staff photo

Good morning. Today’s news roundup includes a new campaign for affordable housing, a tragedy in Westwood, an innovative new project for Westwood, a minor cemetery scandal and more.

A crowd gathers at a covered stage to hear music during the Cinco de Mayo festival hosted by the West Side Coalition on Santa Fe Drive, 1973. (Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/)  archive; denver public library; history; cinco de mayo; chicano; santa fe drive; denverite; denver; colorado;

A crowd gathers at a covered stage to hear music during the Cinco de Mayo festival hosted by the West Side Coalition on Santa Fe Drive, 1973. (Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/)

Cinco:

Kevin has pulled together a visual history of Cinco de Mayo in Denver. Take a look. (Denverite)

The new affordable housing campaign:

Community groups are gearing up for a new push on housing issues in Denver, even as city leaders have to some extent shifted their focus. Erica details the nascent new movement. (Denverite)

Tragedy:

A 15-year-old girl was killed a week before prom when a gunshot struck her in her family’s Westwood home. Last year, her younger brother was killed while he handled a gun. Noelle Phillips reports from the scene. (DP)

Westwood:

About $3 million will go toward renovating Westwood Park and toward programs that will get kids into the outdoors. Details and plans here. (Denverite)

The Hindenburg survivor:

The last survivor of the Hindenburg disaster of 1937 now lives in Parachute on Colorado’s Western Slope. “They toured the control car and the catwalks inside the hydrogen-filled Hindenburg. They could see an ice field as they crossed the Atlantic Ocean, he remembered.” (AP)

Cemetery stuff:

Riverside Cemetery has nearly 70,000 souls, but it’s kind of easy to overlook. Now it has a new challenge: RTD wants to move its entrance. (Denverite)

A Line:

A pedestrian was struck by the A Line. RTD says she was sitting on the tracks several blocks from a crossing. (Denverite)

TABOR survives:

A federal judge has ended Sen. Andy Kerr of Lakewood’s lawsuit that aimed to dismantle the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights, as Dan Njegomir reports. (ColPol)

Arapahoe Square:

John Wenzel scored some new details and a rendering of the Rocky Mountain PBS facility planned for Arapahoe Square, east of downtown. (The Know)

Coffee shop: “Obviously, we don’t hate babies.”

#Drama on the Onefold Instagram after a customer complained about spilled coffee. (Eater)

The latest at MCA:

Rupert Jenkins has the review of the latest exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art. It’s… a little saucy. (One Good Eye)

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Denverite members have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.