Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, July 12

(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

staff photo

News is here. News is now. Today’s topics include some fast-paced developments in the race for the governorship, two different fights over the airport, car-on-train crashes, climate reactions and more.

Boys and girls play at this YMCA swimming pool in Littleton, Colorado. A girl leaps from a diving board in the foreground, and a lifeguard stands atop an elevated chair. A clock and a United States flag are on the brick wall behind him, and houses are in the background. Circa 1961. (Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/X-12075)  summer; pool; historic; denver public library; dpl; archive; archival; denverite

Boys and girls play at a YMCA swimming pool in Littleton, circa 1961. (Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/X-12075)

The race for governor:

Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne is looking more likely as a candidate for governor, but she’d have to get past U.S. Rep. Jared Polis in the Democratic primary. AG Cynthia Coffman is looking like a contender on the Republican side. John Frank and Mark Matthews report. (DP)

Gov. John Hickenlooper has signed Colorado into the U.S. Climate Alliance and set non-mandatory greenhouse-gas reduction goals. Republican hopefuls for governor are variously dismissing it as totally meaningless or an overreaching globalist mandate. (Denverite, Colorado Politics)

Transit and infrastructure:

Denver’s going to start punishing large building owners who don’t report on their structures’ energy efficiency. The city ranks seventh for green-certified buildings, as Adrian reports.

RTD blames drivers for all of this year’s train-vs-car collisions, as Megan reports. (Denverite)

The airlines are pushing back hard against the current plans for the DIA terminal renovation. Their concerns include how much it will cost them, whether they’ll be able to expand their ticket counters and whether security will actually get tighter in the redesign, as Cathy Proctor reports in this extended piece. (DBJ, paywall)

There’s a workers’ strike at the airport today. Its impact remains unclear. (Denverite)

Rural broadband:

CenturyLink is using $26.5 million of federal funding to expand broadband service. So far, they’ve wired about 28,000 households and businesses in Colorado under the initiative, as Tamara Chuang reports. (DP)

Fun:

The Underground Music Showcase gets underway Thursday, July 27 and the final schedule has been released. (Denverite)

Christian just introduced me to Drew Magary, an interesting sports person. (Denverite)

Development:

Condos near Union Station are going on sale for anywhere from $255,000 to $1.6 million. Here’s what the place looks like. (Denverite)

Laradon plans to raise $10 million to rebuild its campus in Globeville. (BusinessDen)

I didn’t read it:

CNBC has a long feature on Colorado’s space industry. Let me know if it’s any good. (CNBC)

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