Street Week: Bruce Randolph

Daniel Bodison is retired, single and looking to stay put

“I still have a lot of neighbors that I’ve grown up with. A lot of them moved out.”

Daniel Bodison sets some old family possessions out for sale in front of his home along Bruce Randolph Avenue. Sept. 11, 2020.

Daniel Bodison sets some old family possessions out for sale in front of his home along Bruce Randolph Avenue. Sept. 11, 2020.

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
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Editor’s note: Kevin and Dave roamed Bruce Randolph Avenue and talked to most everyone they saw. Every day during Street Week, we’re rolling out mini profiles of the everyday heroes they found. Find more here.

“Mom passed away about a year ago, but we kept the house,” Daniel Bodison said as he arranged some of her items on a metal table in front of her family’s home. “I was born in this house, actually.”

The ceramic chickens and bears, the plate bearing “The Last Supper” and decorative candlesticks were for sale alongside a retro bar cart complete with elegant decanters.

Bodison’s father was in the Air Force, stationed at Lowry before it transformed into chic residences. The job took his family to Utah, Germany and Jacksonville. But Bodison was still drawn to his home, along Bruce Randolph Avenue.

Daniel Bodison sets some old family possessions out for sale in front of his home along Bruce Randolph Avenue. Sept. 11, 2020.

Daniel Bodison sets some old family possessions out for sale in front of his home along Bruce Randolph Avenue. Sept. 11, 2020.

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite

Bodison is retired from Denver Public Schools, where he worked for the facility managers department for 25 years.

“I’m just thankful to God that I’ve got the opportunity to have a house, to have a roof over my head,” he said.

The neighborhood has changed a lot since he was a kid. A city report from 1977 said more than 70 percent of residents of the Clayton neighborhood, where Bodison lives, were African American. A similar study from 2016 showed they made up just 23 percent of residents.

“I still have a lot of neighbors that I’ve grown up with. A lot of them moved out. A lot of them are still here,” he said. “I don’t want to have to move out of this neighborhood.”

His home’s value has grown considerably since it was constructed in 1950, but he said there’s no pressure to sell. He can manage the taxes, though they’ve grown, too.

For Bodison, the home represents generational security, a family heirloom his kin can pass along to their children.

“One day, you know, if we get to the point where siblings start passing away and I want to sell, get some money, pass it onto my generations. If they want to go buy something else, that’s cool,” he said. “But I’m trying to stay as long as I can. It’s been a nice ride.

“I’m the youngest sibling. No kids. Never been married,” he continued. “I’m looking for one, looking for a wife. But in due time. In due time. I’m single right now. Shoutout to all the single women.”

Want some more? Explore other Street Week: Bruce Randolph stories.

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