We won’t get to vote on how congressional districts are made

The state Supreme Court has tossed a proposed ballot measure would have taken the job away from the state Legislature and given it to an independent panel.

AP_LOGO_02

DENVER (AP) — A proposed ballot question to change Colorado’s congressional redistricting process has been thrown out by the state Supreme Court.

Tuesday’s decision means that voters won’t get a chance to weigh in on how district boundaries are drawn before the 2020 Census. Colorado is expected to be awarded an eighth congressional seat after that Census because of population growth.

The proposed ballot measure would have taken the job away from the state Legislature and given it to an independent panel. States must adjust congressional lines after every Census.

The Supreme Court ruled 4-3 that Colorado’s ballot measure was improperly worded. Colorado limits ballot questions to a single subject.

The court also rejected a ballot measure to change how districts for the state Legislature are drawn.

Hi! You’re like us!

Looks like you’re the type of person who reads to the ends of articles! Well, true believer, you might really like our morning newsletter. It’s quick, free and gets you up to speed on the important and delightful things happening right here in Denver.

Thanks for reading another Denverite story

Does Denverite help you feel more connected to what’s up in your area? Do you want to be a part of it?

Member donations are critical to our continued existence and growth.

You’re our superpower

Denverite supporters have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.

You’re our superpower

Denverite members have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.