Cold Springs Fire

Take a look at Coloradans’ photos of the Cold Springs Fire

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As the Cold Springs Fire burns through a fourth day, Coloradans are documenting the destruction and the efforts to stop it.

Here’s a look at what they’re seeing.

From the frontlines. #nedfire #coldspringsfire

A post shared by Andrew Joslin (@omgjoz) on

https://www.instagram.com/p/BHtMBA_jcCH/?tagged=coldspringsfire

Wildfire in Nederland, CO. 16 miles from our house 😳 #coldspringsfire

A post shared by Katie Harris (@nailsforsanity) on

Thinking about Nederland tonight. #coldspringsfire

A post shared by Dane DeLozier (@danedelozier) on

Timelapse of the Cold Springs Forest Fire on Sat. Night. It's unfortunate how this started and it could have been so easily prevented. Please remember to properly put out your camp fires! I've put a link in my profile in case you're wondering. Please be safe out there everyone and once again, huge thanks to the firefighters taking this on. Heed those evacuation alerts/warnings. Fingers crossed and hoping we get some calm winds. Instructions from there us Forest Service website: If you are going to have a campfire: Use an existing fire ring, don't create a new one. When not in a designated campground, build your fire within a ring of rocks. Clear all vegetation away from the fire ring (remove all flammable materials such as needles, leaves, sticks, etc.) Select an open level spot away from trees, logs, stumps, overhanging branches, dense dry grass, and forest litter. Keep your campfire small. Keep plenty of water and a shovel nearby for throwing dirt on the fire if it gets out of control. Never leave a campfire unattended! Even a small breeze could quickly cause the fire to spread. Make sure a responsible adult is always in attendance. When putting out your campfire: First, drown the campfire with water! Next, mix the ashes and embers with soil. Scrape all partially-burned sticks and logs to make sure all the hot embers are off them. Stir the embers after they are covered with water and make sure that everything is wet. Feel the coals, embers, and any partially-burned wood with your hands. Everything (including the rock fire ring) should be cool to the touch. Feel under the rocks to make sure no embers underneath.When you think you are done, take an extra minute and add more water. Finally, check the entire campsite for possible sparks or embers, because it only takes one to start a forest fire. Remember…if it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave. Please take the time to completely put out your campfire, it could prevent a wildfire. #kdvr #yesweather #coloradotography

A post shared by Ricardo (@astrosherpa) on

Want some more? Explore other Cold Springs Fire stories.

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