Denver renters see less savings splitting a two-bedroom apartment

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A home and early fall foliage in Lincoln Park. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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A home and early fall foliage in Lincoln Park. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Credit our rugged frontier individualism or a collective appreciation of the no-pants life, but Denver renters save less getting a roommate than most of the top 25 rental markets that Trulia studied

To be fair, renting a two-bedroom home and splitting it with a roommate still saves the average renter $405 a month, according to Trulia. It’s just that compared to 24 other cities, that savings is a bit lower proportionally.

New Yorkers stand the most to gain from a roommate — a 40.4 percent savings — and Denver is 24th by the same measure with a savings of only 33.7 percent.

In further fodder for the would-be Denver singleton, the average millennial in Denver can spend only 24 percent of their income on rent, according to Trulia’s analysis of census data and rents.

While that may be still a hefty sum, the federal standard for unaffordability is 30 percent of one’s income towards housing costs.