Denver real estate in March: No houses, more problems

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Little boxes on the hillside, and yes I do believe that is ticky tacky. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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Houses houses everywhere, but not a one to buy. Ok, well maybe one. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

It’s been 10 whole days since I mentioned how few houses Denver has for sale, and it bears repeating. Like for instance, if you want to buy a home for under $300,000.

“Multiple offers [are] basically an expectation,” said local Redfin real estate agent Corey Keach in a news release for the agency’s housing demand index. “And it’s rare for a non-cash buyer to win any home under $300,000.” 

Or if you care about home prices.

Denver, Seattle and Portland have topped the Case-Shiller Index for the last year. Meaning, for each of the last 12 months, Denver home prices have increased compared to the same time a year ago. For January, Denver prices increased 9.2 percent.

Remember that the Case-Shiller index looks at repeat home sales, and thus does not include new construction. And since not a lot of new homes have entered the market, Case-Shiller can be a proxy for home prices in Denver.