Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Dec. 20

Sometimes I listen to overly dramatic electronic music while I write the news. That’s probably why you feel a thrilling tingle when you read Denverite.

(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

staff photo

Hello, friends. I have a confession. Sometimes I listen to overly dramatic electronic music while I write the news. I can’t listen to anything with words when I write, and sometimes I really just need the extra excitement to get through city budget documents. That’s probably why you feel a thrilling tingle when you read Denverite: It’s infused with techno.

A grocery delivery wagon in Denver circa 1904-1915. (Charles S. Lillybridge/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

A grocery delivery wagon in Denver circa 1904-1915. (Charles S. Lillybridge/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Weather:

Warm today, winter tomorrow. Expect a few inches of snow on Thursday and cold temperatures for a good while to follow. (Denverite)

Development:

From the Alamo Drafthouse to 12-story, block-long condos, Adrian has your informational tour of a rapidly changing neighborhood on Denver’s west side. (Denverite)

After 55 years, Francis Fontonia has moved out of the “rose house” on Logan and Alameda. Yesterday, crews began to dismantle the rose garden. Ashley reports. (Denverite)

The airport has billions of dollars of spending plans. Here’s a helpful explainer from Elisa Wiseman. (5280)

Curiosity:

Luke Runyon has a fascinating story about how the Grand River became the Colorado River. (KUNC)

Immigration:

Viviana Andazola Marquez wrote about her father’s immigration case for The New York Times in October. Last week, she discovered he had been deported after he missed their usual call. This is what happened. (Denverite)

Ingrid LaTorre, the Peruvian immigrant whose fight against deportation Denverite has followed closely, has taken sanctuary in a Boulder church. Mitchell Byars reports. (Camera)

Government:

Betsy DeVos has visited Denver twice since she was sworn in as education secretary, but her presence has been felt in Colorado’s education policy and politics all year. (Chalkbeat)

State planners say the federal tax bill would increase Colorado’s revenue by about 3 percent, though it could hurt people in higher-tax cities. It also could reduce the number of people with health insurance by 230,000. And, of course, a cut to federal revenues is likely to affect social services and other parts of government. (CPR, DP, NYT)

The city released new details of the program that will force (and help) homeowners to pay for sidewalk repairs. Jon Murray reports. (DP)

Business:

The North Denver Tribune has ended publication after 80 years. Kailyn Lamb reports. (BusinessDen)

A Denver company that makes “ethics software” just raised $25 million. Its client list reportedly includes Uber. It does stuff like remind you to obey certain rules when you go overseas. Tamara Chuang reports. (DP)