Denver in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, March 27

(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

staff photo

You know what I like about this job? We’ve recruited readers who are wonderfully varied in their interests and expertise. I’ll be making calls into the bowels of the statehouse, or about some esoteric topic, and the person who picks up will say, “Oh, Denverite!” We really care about the details of the machines that make our lives go ’round, and we’re glad you do, too. Here’s today’s roundup.

Men pose near log cabins, an ore cart and mine tracks, likely at Forest-Payroll Tunnel Mine near Rico, Colo. in 1897. (T.J. McKee/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Men pose near log cabins, an ore cart and mine tracks, likely at Forest-Payroll Tunnel Mine near Rico, Colo. in 1897. (T.J. McKee/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Courts:

Denver will likely go to trial over a class-action lawsuit that claims it violated the rights of people experiencing homelessness. (Denverite)

Rene Lima-Marin was mistakenly released from prison eight years into his 98-year sentence in 2008. Ten years later, he may be truly free. (Denverite)

The second of two teenagers charged in the murder of Nicholas Lewis, chef at Blackbird Public House, has been found guilty. He faces 40 years to life in prison. Ashley reports. (Denverite)

The El Paso County sheriff says he will fight for his ability to keep holding people in jail so ICE can come get them. The ACLU argues that’s illegal if there’s no criminal reason. Corey Hutchins reports. (Independent)

Politicians:

Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan announced that he has cancer and, while he plans to continue serving as mayor, will not seek reelection in 2019. Esteban reports. (Denverite)

Denver City Council will discuss a possible investigation into Mayor Michael Hancock’s sexually suggestive texts in a closed executive session today. Jamie Leary reports. (7)

Development & transit:

An effort to build hundreds of housing units for homeless people has been rejected by the feds, according to Lakewood’s mayor. Kieran Nicholson reports. (DP)

Locomotive engineers have made “dozens of serious mistakes” on RTD’s A and B lines in the last two years — a relatively high number, according to one expert. Sources told Nathaniel Minor that the design of the system, low wages and tired operators were factors. Really interesting stuff. (CPR)

Denver could install bus lanes and protected bike lanes along 18th and 19th streets, Dave Sachs reports. (Streetsblog)

Cannabis:

Mitch McConnell, one of the country’s highest-ranking Republicans, gave his “full-throated support” for a law that would remove hemp from regulation as a controlled substance. Hemp is basically the non-drug version of marijuana. Alicia Wallace reports. (The Cannabist)

Leisure:

The casual Italian joint has been incubating for a while at Avanti Food & Beverage. It will open Chow Morso Osteria this summer and close the Avanti spot in the fall. Ashley reports. (Denverite)

United Airlines is offering daily direct flights from Denver to London through Oct. 26. Ed Sealover reports. (DBJ)

Ashley is very excited about the idea of a snowcat running around a ski resort with tacos and beer. (Steamboat Today)

News on news:

The Athletic, a subscription-based sports news site, is launching in Denver — and they’ve scooped up three of the Denver Post’s leading reporters: Nicki Jhabvala, Nick Kosmider and Nick Groke. Thomas Gounley reports. (BusinessDen)