There appeared to be *slightly* more traffic in Denver today than a month ago

Denver’s stay-at-home order is very much still intact. Colorado’s isn’t.

Rush hour traffic was super light on Broadway at 15th on Monday, April 27, 2020, in downtown Denver.

Rush hour traffic was super light on Broadway at 15th on Monday, April 27, 2020, in downtown Denver.

Hart Van Denburg/CPR News
200219-ANA-CAMPBELL-STAFF-PHOTO-KEVINJBEATY-05-sq2

While Denver continues to hunker down through at least May 8, the last day of the city’s stay-at-home orders, Colorado’s “safer-at-home” started today. They’re meant to ease the state out of the strict guidelines Denver, Colorado’s largest city and a hot spot of COVID-19, is still abiding by to avoid spreading the disease caused by the new coronavirus. In places not Denver, life will be a little more normal.

So, yes, technically Denverites should still be at home, leaving only for essentials. But we still wondered what this morning’s traffic situation would be like.

CPR visuals editor Hart Van Denburg returned to two typically busy roads in Denver this morning, more than a month after he captured them on March 23, the first day of the city’s stay-at-home order.

A non-existent morning rush hour on Colfax, viewed from Federal Boulevard. The morning after Gov. Jared Polis advised people to stay home, Colfax Avenue from Bennet on up into the mountains where it becomes Hwy 40, was a ghost of its normal self — although some facets of life carried on as usual, Monday, March 23, 2020.

A non-existent morning rush hour on Colfax, viewed from Federal Boulevard. The morning after Gov. Jared Polis advised people to stay home, Colfax Avenue from Bennet on up into the mountains where it becomes Hwy 40, was a ghost of its normal self — although some facets of life carried on as usual, Monday, March 23, 2020.

Hart Van Denburg/CPR News
Rush hour on Colfax Avenue heading into Denver felt more like an early Sunday morning on Monday, April 27, 2020, as the state began its first day of “safer-at-home” during the coronavirus outbreak.

Rush hour on Colfax Avenue heading into Denver felt more like an early Sunday morning on Monday, April 27, 2020, as the state began its first day of “safer-at-home” during the coronavirus outbreak.

Hart Van Denburg/CPR News
A nearly deserted Broadway where it crosses 14th Avenue in Denver, Monday morning March 23, 2020, the day after Gov. Jared Polis advised people to stay home during the coronavirus outbreak.

A nearly deserted Broadway where it crosses 14th Avenue in Denver, Monday morning March 23, 2020, the day after Gov. Jared Polis advised people to stay home during the coronavirus outbreak.

Hart Van Denburg/CPR News
Rush hour traffic was super light on Broadway at 15th on Monday, April 27, 2020, in downtown Denver.

Rush hour traffic was super light on Broadway at 15th on Monday, April 27, 2020, in downtown Denver.

Hart Van Denburg/CPR News

Thanks for reading another Denverite story

Looks like you’re the type of person who reads to the ends of articles! Well, true believer, you might really like our morning newsletter. It’s quick, free and gets you up to speed on the important and delightful things happening right here in Denver. Does Denverite help you feel more connected to what’s up in your area? Do you want to be a part of it?

Member donations are critical to our continued existence and growth.

Weird times

Denverite is powered by you. In these weird times, the local vigilance, the local context, the local flavor — it’s powered through your donations. If you’d miss Denverite if it disappeared tomorrow, donate today.

You’re our superpower

Denverite supporters have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.

You’re our superpower

Denverite members have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.