The city shut down Mutiny Information Cafe. Denver rallied and saved it in less than 24 hours.

The counter-cultural hub has been trying to get back on its feet after a pandemic, a co-owner’s nearly fatal heart attack, and vandalism.

Mutiny Information Cafe is boarded up and covered with paint on Broadway. April 1, 2020. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Mutiny Information Cafe is boarded up and covered with paint on Broadway. April 1, 2020. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

kyle harris

Update on Sept. 24: This story and headline have been updated.

Mutiny Information Cafe, a counter-cultural gathering spot at 2 South Broadway, has had a tough run the past few years.

There was the pandemic, co-owner Jim Norris said. Co-owner Matt Megyesi was hospitalized for months and nearly died. The front door and windows have been smashed. An employee stole from the company.

And then this week presented the latest struggle: Denver’s Department of Finance shut Mutiny down after the business fell behind on taxes. Norris said the business had 30 days to pay off what was due or close for good.

Mutiny Information Cafe co-owner Matt Megyesi running the shop's coffee counter.

Mutiny Information Cafe co-owner Matt Megyesi running the shop's coffee counter.

David Sands

The cafe launched a GoFundMe page Thursday night, asking for help from the communities it has long fostered. The goal was to raise $42,126.

Within 24 hours, more than 900 people rallied to save Mutiny, donating $9,000 more dollars than what the cafe owed the city.

“Unbelievable,” Norris said Saturday morning. “Me and Matt and the little family are just stunned. Stunned and humbled.”

This was the third crowdfunding campaign the business, which expanded to Trinidad, Colorado in October 2020, has run in recent years. All have been successful.

“Coming out of Covid has been hard on all small businesses and humans across the world,” Norris and Kyle Sutherland wrote on the fundraising page earlier this week. “For us, with Matt’s unfortunate heart attack and miraculous but slow recovery, it has been a particularly hard time to recover from — as he is the brains behind the money while Jim has always been the heart behind the vibe.”

Norris took full ownership of the financial mistakes, but the cafe’s supporters were understanding.

After all, Mutiny has done more to support the poetry, podcasting and underground music scene than most Denver businesses. It has hosted free events and has been a safe-haven for all types of people looking for a cup of coffee and a chance to browse books, comics and records or just sit and chat with fellow misfits.

Norris said he and Megyesi have not been paid since April.

“We want to stay open and continue to serve our community to the best of our ability and always grow and improve to be a haven amidst the continual chaos of the modern world and all of its malaise,” the GoFundMe post stated. “It is time to dig deep as a community and support each other so that another Denver icon doesn’t disappear in the whirlwind of gentrification, new development, and big business.”

Mutiny Information Cafe on South Broadway. Feb. 16, 2022.

Mutiny Information Cafe on South Broadway. Feb. 16, 2022.

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite

People dug deep quickly, and the staff at Mutiny were grateful.

“We are absolutely floored with humility by the swiftness and abundance of continuous love and support we have received in the last 24 hours,” the GoFundMe page stated. “It’s moments like this that remind all of us how necessary and special it is to create and share accessible spaces with and for ALL people and artists in our community. We will continue to grow and learn while remaining true to the vision Mutiny has come to embody. Thank you, from the bottom to the top of our hearts.”

Norris anticipates Mutiny will open by mid-week, once he has secured the campaign money and paid off the taxes.

Said Norris: “It’s a Wonderful Life, right?”

 

 


 

 

Mutiny Information Cafe, a counter-cultural gathering spot at 2 South Broadway, has had a rough couple of years.

There was the pandemic. Co-owner Matt Megyesi’s heart stopped working, and he was hospitalized for months and nearly died. The front door and windows have been smashed.

Now, the business, which expanded to Trinidad, Colorado in October 2020, owes back taxes, and the city has shut it down until it pays up. Co-owner Jim Norris announced the closure on a GoFundMe page launched Thursday night.

Mutiny Information Cafe co-owner Matt Megyesi running the shop's coffee counter.

Mutiny Information Cafe co-owner Matt Megyesi running the shop's coffee counter.

David Sands

“Coming out of Covid has been hard on all small businesses and humans across the world,” Norris and Kyle Sutherland wrote on the fundraising page. “For us, with Matt’s unfortunate heart attack and miraculous but slow recovery, it has been a particularly hard time to recover from — as he is the brains behind the money while Jim has always been the heart behind the vibe.”

The shop has done more to support the poetry, podcasting and underground music scene than most Denver businesses. It has hosted free events and has been a safe-haven for all types of people looking for a cup of coffee and a chance to browse books, comics and records or just sit and chat with fellow misfits.

Mutiny Information Cafe on South Broadway. Feb. 16, 2022.

Mutiny Information Cafe on South Broadway. Feb. 16, 2022.

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite

“We want to stay open and continue to serve our community to the best of our ability and always grow and improve to be a haven amidst the continual chaos of the modern world and all of its malaise,” the GoFundMe post stated. “It is time to dig deep as a community and support each other so that another Denver icon doesn’t disappear in the whirlwind of gentrification, new development, and big business. We have always tried our best to be a hub of information, an underground network of mutual aid and support – and right now we need the people of our changing city to help us continue to serve you as not just a cafe/venue/bookstore/huge garage sale, but as neighbors and fellow human beings.”

The store said it has 30 days to catch up on taxes or it will shut down for good.

Mutiny Information Cafe, a counter-cultural gathering spot at 2 South Broadway, has had a tough run the past few years.

There was the pandemic, co-owner Jim Norris said. Co-owner Matt Megyesi was hospitalized for months and nearly died. The front door and windows have been smashed. An employee stole from the company.

And then this week presented the latest struggle: Denver’s Department of Finance shut Mutiny down after the business fell behind on taxes. Norris said the business had 30 days to pay off what was due or shut down for good.

The cafe launched a GoFundMe page Thursday night, asking for help from the communities it has long fostered. The goal was to raise $42,126.

Within 24 hours, more than 900 people rallied to save Mutiny, donating $9,000 more dollars than what the cafe owed the city.

“Unbelievable,” Norris said Saturday morning. “Me, and Matt and the little family are just stunned. Stunned and humbled.”

This was the third crowdfunding campaign the business, which expanded to Trinidad, Colorado in October 2020, has run in recent years. All have been successful.

“Coming out of Covid has been hard on all small businesses and humans across the world,” Norris and Kyle Sutherland wrote on the fundraising page earlier this week. “For us, with Matt’s unfortunate heart attack and miraculous but slow recovery, it has been a particularly hard time to recover from — as he is the brains behind the money while Jim has always been the heart behind the vibe.”

Norris took full ownership of the financial mistakes, but the cafe’s supporters were understanding.

After all, Mutiny has done more to support the poetry, podcasting and underground music scene than most Denver businesses. It has hosted free events and has been a safe-haven for all types of people looking for a cup of coffee and a chance to browse books, comics and records or just sit and chat with fellow misfits.

Norris said he and Megyesi have not been paid since April.

“We want to stay open and continue to serve our community to the best of our ability and always grow and improve to be a haven amidst the continual chaos of the modern world and all of its malaise,” the GoFundMe post stated. “It is time to dig deep as a community and support each other so that another Denver icon doesn’t disappear in the whirlwind of gentrification, new development, and big business.”

People dug deep quickly, and the staff at Mutiny were grateful.

“We are absolutely floored with humility by the swiftness and abundance of continuous love and support we have received in the last 24 hours,” the GoFundMe page stated. “It’s moments like this that remind all of us how necessary and special it is to create and share accessible spaces with and for ALL people and artists in our community. We will continue to grow and learn while remaining true to the vision Mutiny has come to embody. Thank you, from the bottom to the top of our hearts.”

Norris anticipates Mutiny will open by mid-week, once he has secured the campaign money and paid off the taxes.

Said Norris: “It’s a Wonderful Life, right?”

 

 

 

Weird times

Denverite is powered by you. In these weird times, the local vigilance, the local context, the local flavor — it’s powered through your donations. If you’d miss Denverite if it disappeared tomorrow, donate today.

You’re our superpower

Denverite supporters have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.

You’re our superpower

Denverite members have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.