Real estate reads: Overvalued homes, lots and lots of floors plus AirBnb moves

Yes, yes, Denver home prices are high, says another Denver Post story. But what caught my eye was this:

staff photo
Stapleton residences under downtown Denver's skyline. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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Stapleton residences under downtown Denver's skyline. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

My three favorite real estate reads of the afternoon so far: Colorado homes are the third-most overvalued, how many floors all the new multi-family residence have and more.

Yes, yes, Denver home prices are high, says another Denver Post story. But what caught my eye was this: Colorado homes are the third-most overvalued after North Dakota and Texas, according to Arch MI. And the odds that prices will fall are only 2 percent. Nationally, the chance of falling home prices is 5 percent.

DenverInfill rounded up all the multi-family residential developments downtown, minus a few townhomes, and issued their bi-annual update. My favorite part is the breakdown by number of floors. Only seven percent of these developments have more than 21 floors.

AirBnb is raising money and current projections suggest it’s the fourth-most valuable start-up in the world. Meanwhile, San Francisco is trying to force the company to only show listings from host who’ve registered with the city. Slate writer Henry Grabar says there’s a pretty good chance that won’t fly.