St. Andrew’s has decided to build a tiny-home village in Denver

“After careful consideration, and a time of prayerful reflection, the people of St. Andrew’s have decided to proceed with the proposed Tiny House Village.”

(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

staff photo
A tiny village in Seattle was the inspiration for the St. Andrew's plan. (Courtesy St. Andrew's)

A tiny village in Seattle was the inspiration for the St. Andrew's plan. (Courtesy St. Andrew's)

After a couple months of consideration, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church has announced its intention to build a village of eight small homes on its campus in Five Points for people experiencing homelessness.

“After careful consideration, and a time of prayerful reflection, the people of St. Andrew’s have decided to proceed with the proposed Tiny House Village,” church leadership said in a news release, saying it had surveyed its parishioners last week and found support for the plan.

The church says it has been working with “multiple departments” in the city, with “very productive conversations.” The group says it’s committed to “meet their requirements for construction and development of this project, to the best of our ability.”

Some of the church’s neighbors are not in favor of the project, according to the church’s written statement, with concerns including “safety, sanitation, cooperative partnership and transparency.” St. Andrew’s announced that it would continue to engage with those neighbors.


No word on when construction would begin. For more details of the plan, read our previous coverage. Another group, the Interfaith Alliance, is planning a similar project in RiNo.

The tiny home planners say they’ll start talking with the city again in the new year to define the next steps.  City staff confirmed they are talking with the group.

“The city’s planning department is working with St. Andrews on their idea. We appreciate their creative approach to housing Denver’s homeless. As Mayor Hancock has said all along, the city can’t solve this by itself — partnerships are critical,” wrote Amber Miller, a spokeswoman for Mayor Michael Hancock, in an email.

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