Denver in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Jan. 19

(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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Good morning. Some personal news: I managed to get out of bed in time for a full 10 minutes of exercise before work. Highly recommended! Seriously, even a little bit will make you feel better and hopefully get you (and me) in the habit. Anyway, today’s news includes spacecraft design, Tasers, light-rail redevelopment, the aerotropolis and much more.

Spectators watch as former President Theodore Roosevelt rides in an open automobile, with Secret Service Agents, in a motorcade down 17th (Seventeenth) Street in Denver, Colorado. Circa 1910. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-87)

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Spectators watch as former President Theodore Roosevelt rides in an open automobile, with Secret Service Agents, in a motorcade down 17th (Seventeenth) Street in Denver, Colorado. Circa 1910. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-87)

Greenwood Village is not so sure about development near light-rail station.

“City planners are pushing” to have the area around the Orchard Road light rail station redeveloped to more urban standards. As per usual, neighbors are concerned about traffic and the loss of the community’s identity. (KDVR)

Shake Shack will be at 30th and Larimer.

It’s the first tenant of a brand new retail/office development. Cook-Out is still better, I assume. (BusinessDen)

“Stop resisting.”

Those were a Denver police officer’s words to a man he had just hit with an electric shock. Police were on the scene responding to a fight. The man, Greg Heard, had emerged from some shrubbery, as ordered, but took one or two additional steps after being told to stop. It’s now the subject of a lawsuit. (Westword)

How a Denver startup is changing spacecraft design:

York Space Systems has scored a major contract for its standardized, affordable (relatively speaking) spacecraft. Chloe’s got a really interesting read on their “Model T” approach to design. (Denverite)

A major first step for the “aerotropolis” is done:

Panasonic’s 112,500-square-foot operations and technology center has finished construction. It’s part of Peña Station NEXT, which will supposedly be a “smart” mini-city with all kinds of automatic streetlights, a solar/battery power system and autonomous shuttles. (DBJ)

Stupid snowy Crested Butte:

Here’s a trip report on what we’ve been missing. (OpenSnow)

Lynx death:

The lynx that wandered through Purgatory Resort had a throat tumor and died of reportedly natural causes. It had been implanted with a chip that tracked its wandering across the Colorado mountains. There are perhaps only 75 wild lynx in the state. (DP)

More:
  • Denver accepts applications for social-use marijuana businesses starting Friday. Some big questions about that, though. (AP via Denverite)
  • A doctor’s Subaru was knocked off Speer Boulevard and into the Cherry Creek riverbed. It should be fixable. (Denverite)
  • Want to oversee Denver Sheriff’s Department reforms? Sign up. (Denverite)