South High School is on lockout as Denver police investigate Safe2Tell tip

South High School. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

South High School. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

South High School is on lockout one day after a fatal shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch.

Denver police said shortly before 11 a.m. that there does not appear to be a credible threat to the school. The school remains on lockout while they continue to look at the situation.

Police initially reported, just after 9 a.m. Tuesday, that the school was on lockdown, but corrected itself. Denver Public Schools instituted the lockout because of a tip that came in through Safe2Tell, which allows students and anyone else to report possible threats. Police have not provided any information on the nature of the threat, but police are making contact with a student based on the tip.

DPS spokesperson Anna Alejo said the lockout was still in place as of 10 a.m. She said it was possible it could be lifted before class dismissed. She declined to describe the nature of the Safe2Tell tip.

Lockout procedures generally mean classes go on and students can move throughout the building. A lockdown generally restricts movement among students and staff much more than a lockout does.

DPS has clarified that students at South are not being asked to stay home. They can come to school, where entry will be controlled.

Yesterday’s shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch left one student dead and eight others injured. Two suspects are in custody. More on that from CPR News here.

Denver Public Schools Superintendent Susana Cordova sent a letter to parents and the community on Wednesday morning. Cordova said in the letter the district’s safety department was notified by Denver Police that Tuesday’s incident was confined to Douglas County and there was no ongoing threat to any DPS schools. The district is increasing safety officers visibility and has made mental health services available to students. The district also has a page on its website with information on how to talk to kids about violence.

“It’s important to listen to our children and validate their feelings,”Cordova wrote in Wednesday’s letter. “By listening, we’re able to address their specific worries and acknowledge their feelings as they process the news and ongoing events.”

CPR News’ Jenny Brundin contributed to this report.

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