Denver weather vs. spring: Snow, ice and slush will give way to sunshine

Just after midnight, the National Weather Service reported 4.8 inches of snow in downtown Denver — but the sun’s out now.

A snowy night and slippery conditions on Sheridan Boulevard, Feb. 7, 2020. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

A snowy night and slippery conditions on Sheridan Boulevard, Feb. 7, 2020. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

staff photo

Last updated: 8:15 a.m.

Good morning. We’re doing this again. It’s not a lot of snow. It’s not the coldest we’ve ever been. But it does feel personal this time.

Just after midnight, the National Weather Service reported 4.8 inches of snow in downtown Denver and 3.1 out at DIA.

It’s 20 degrees out and you can count on “slick and hazardous travel conditions” left behind by snow that has moved on south, the NWS says, but the ol’ eyeball forecast is calling for about four inches of blankets and a gallon of coffee. We can confirm I-25 and I-70 through downtown are messy.

Soothe yourself with some facts about how Denver’s snowplow situation differs from the way they do it in Salt Lake City or Minneapolis.

Early alerts from CDOT show cars having some trouble on I-25 in the south metro area and near Colorado Springs. Denver Public Schools are officially open and not delayed, but DPS messaging acknowledges people will be getting places late.

The storm was worse to the west, with reports of 9 or 10 inches of snow falling in Boulder, and 14 in Allenspark.

The NWS had warned of snow and slush accumulating on I-25 and other roads last night, with snow accumulating an inch or two an hour in the heaviest parts of the night. We didn’t break any records — coldest-ever April 19 was 13 degrees, we hit 20.

Later today we’ll allegedly see the sheepish return of the sun and temperatures like 38 or 39 or one of those kinds of numbers. We’re probably done with snow until Wednesday, which is tomorrow.

Try to drive less, drive slower, drive at a non-peak time, maybe don’t drive at all.

It’s fine. Good luck out there. At least it’s not a bomb cyclone.

Weird times

Denverite is powered by you. In these weird times, the local vigilance, the local context, the local flavor — it’s powered through your donations. If you’d miss Denverite if it disappeared tomorrow, donate today.

You’re our superpower

Denverite supporters have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.

You’re our superpower

Denverite members have made the decision to financially support local journalism that matters to you. Ready to tell your networks why? Sharing our “About” page with your own personal comments could really help us out.